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Posts Tagged ‘Yiddish’

So, Wild Water Kingdom Didn’t Happen…But I’m Going Soon!

August 17, 2011 1 comment

Frowny Face with FAIL stamp via http://scottcowley.posterous.comwhat-i-wish-i-knew-about-fitness-three-months

I have good news and bad news.

The bad news first: I was wrong when I told you yesterday that I’d be going to Wild Water Kingdom today. Unfortunately, due to circumstances beyond my and their control the friends I was slated to go with all were forced to bail at the last minute. I feel bad that I told you guys something would happen that didn’t come true but as the Yiddish proverb paraphrased from Psalms verse 33:10 (see below for quoted verse”) says: “מענטש טראַכט, גאָט לאַכט.” Am I right? What? You can’t read Hebrew letters? Oh, well then that actually says “Mentsch tracht, Gott lacht.” Oh, come on! You don’t speak Yiddish? (Neither do I, much to the chagrin of my grandmother) it translates as:

“Man plans, God laughs.”

The GOOD news now: I am still totally going to be going to Wild Water Kingdom only it will be this weekend as opposed to having gone today. I will be sure to keep all y’all updated on my adventures to the Watery Kingdom in Brampton as soon as I go!

And, in searching for the above graphic which I found at http://scottcowley.posterous.com/ I also found while doing my Google Image Search this awesome image below at http://www.shoppedornot.com/?p=3096. I am sure I am going to find a way to use it at some point. Also, what do you think? Shopped? Or not? I think it is TOTALLY shopped.

frowny face in beer glass shopped or not via http://www.shoppedornot.com/?p=3096


Image Links & Bible Quote:

Frowny Face with FAIL stamp via http://scottcowley.posterous.com/what-i-wish-i-knew-about-fitness-three-months

Psalms verse 33:10 “The Lord brings the counsel of the nations to nothing; he frustrates the plans of the peoples.”

Frowny face in beer glass shopped or not via http://www.shoppedornot.com/?p=3096

Cousin’s Wedding Weekend Musings. Yiddish Words That Have No English Translation

May 27, 2011 2 comments

Yes, this weekend is my cousin’s wedding. He is getting married on Sunday so tonight we had a huge family dinner with all the cousins, my brothers in from out of town, my cousin’s aunts and uncles and all the grandparents. It was quite the event. But this whole weekend has gotten me thinking about a Yiddish word – related to marriages – that as far as I can tell has no English translation.

When I say this word has no English translation I don’t mean that the concept doesn’t translate or that it doesn’t make sense in English. What I mean is that there is no word for it at all but if I explained it to you you’d understand it. It has led me to wonder if there is any archaic English word that fell out of use over the centuries. If there is such a word I would like to revive it.

The word I am referring to is “Machatunim” (that’s pronounced “mah-chah-too-neem” and the ‘ch’ is the guttural, throat clearing sound). The word describes the relationship between one’s parents and their child’s parents-in-law. The only term I can think of to describe it in English would be “co-in-laws”.

If you aren’t following let me give you an example: I get married to a girl so her parents are obviously my mother-in-law and father-in-law but there doesn’t seem to be an English term to describe the relationship between my parents and my wife’s parents. My parents are my wife’s mother and father-in-law and her parents are the same for me but aside from calling them “my son’s mother-in-law” or “my son’s father-in-law” or “my son’s in-laws” there is no definitive term.

In my research into this I found out there is actually a Spanish terms for this – according to Yahoo! Answers UK anyway – and that is “consuegros”. Google Translate won’t translate the word to English, maybe because there isn’t a translation? So I am left to trust the Yahoo! Answers UK poster.

Do you know of any word in English that describes this relationship? Any word in any other language that describes this relationship? Should we make one up for English if one doesn’t yet exist? Let me know what you think!

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